They finally got him!

If only I had known about this before I wired $5,000 to that guy…

Nigerian email scam

Full statement here.

[…] On April 11, 2018, OPARA pled guilty to conspiracy to commit wire fraud and wire fraud before U.S. District Judge Paul A. Crotty, who imposed today’s sentence.

U.S. Attorney Geoffrey S. Berman said: “From halfway around the world, Onyekachi Emmanuel Opara ran a global email scam business that victimized thousands of people out of millions of dollars. The global reach of our Office and the FBI ensured that Opara will serve time in the United States for his crimes.”

According to the allegations in the Indictment to which OPARA pled guilty and statements made at the plea and sentencing proceedings:

Between 2014 and 2016, OPARA and his co-defendant, David Chukwuneke Adindu (“Adindu”), participated in multiple business email compromise (“BEC”) scams that targeted thousands of victims around the world, including in the United States, the United Kingdom, Australia, Switzerland, Sweden, New Zealand, and Singapore. OPARA sent bogus emails to employees of the victim companies directing that funds be transferred to specified bank accounts. The emails purported to be from supervisors at those companies or from third party vendors with whom the companies did business. In reality, the emails were either sent from email accounts with domain names very similar to those of the companies and vendors, or the metadata for the emails was modified to make it appear as if the emails had been sent from legitimate email addresses. After victims transferred the funds as directed in the bogus emails, the funds were quickly withdrawn or transferred to other bank accounts controlled by scheme participants. In total, the BEC scam participants attempted to steal more than $25 million from victims around the world.

In furtherance of the BEC scams, OPARA created accounts on dating websites and entered into online romantic relationships with individuals in the United States by portraying himself as a young attractive woman named “Barbara.” “Barbara” would then instruct these individuals in the United States to send their money overseas and/or to receive money from BEC scams and forward the proceeds to other scheme participants located overseas. For example, one victim with whom OPARA struck up a romantic relationship sent over $600,000 of the victim’s own money to bank accounts controlled by scheme participants at OPARA’s direction. OPARA also attempted to recruit at least 14 other individuals via dating websites to receive funds from BEC scams into their bank accounts and then transfer the proceeds to overseas bank accounts.

OPARA was arrested on December 22, 2016, in Johannesburg, South Africa, and was extradited to the Southern District of New York on January 26, 2018. […]

Thanks for all the fish

A group of dolphins is called a “pod,” apparently. A group of hundreds of dolphins? Say hello to the Superpod:

Over the last week, a group of common dolphins has been racing along the Pacific coast in Monterey, Calif.

So Patrick Webster, the social media content creator at the Monterey Bay Aquarium, set out on Monday to shoot video of the mammals, working together to corral schools of small fish.

What he captured is a remarkable scene: dozens and dozens dolphins, breaking through the surface and plunging down again, under skies the same gray as the water. Webster said the whole group was thought to number more than 1,000.

Minimum wage machine

This is pretty funny:

If you’ve always wanted to work for minimum wage, but in typical overachieving fashion haven’t quite got there yet, the Minimum Wage Machine will pay you $7.15 for an hour of turning the crank-handle.

Workers will receive one penny for every 5.04 seconds’ worth of work, which at $7.15 an hour is the minimum pay required by the NY state—or at least, it was back in 2008 when this piece was created by artist Blake Fall-Conroy.

Training

Every age has its rituals. In the Age of Google, we have the Ritual of the reCAPTCHA, a compulsory visual test that requires a carbon-based organism to prove its sentience to a computer by selecting squares that seem to contain grainy images of a specified object. The organism must do this correctly in order to demonstrate to the computer’s satisfaction that it (the organism) possesses the mental faculties of invariant recognition, segmentation, and parsing, in which attributes humans tend to excel over computers. If the organism passes the test, it is permitted to continue with its intended task on the website.

That problem is that many human beings who are more or less sentient find the average reCAPTCHA to be hard and frustrating, owing to the intentionally crappy quality of the images, poor visibility of the objects, as well as certain definitional problems that the average internet user is ill-equipped to deal with. For example, should the user, tasked with identifying “street signs,” click on a square that contains part of a sign post? Then there are questions of process. Does the user click Verify immediately after clicking all the relevant squares, or wait for new images to materialize in the squares that have been clicked? None of this is clear, none of it is explained. The user twists in a fog of doubt and confusion, and frequently fails the test.

Google reCAPTCHA evil

Choose wisely (Source)

The reCAPTCHA is the reductio ad absurdum of modern life, a grudging surrender of countless man-hours of labor (over 100 million reCAPTCHAs are displayed every day) to feed the ravenous maw of an emerging artificial superintelligence. Because, of course, by completing these image recognition tasks, the human user is training Google’s vast machine learning datasets. TechRadar thanks you for your service in helping develop self-driving cars.

But while we are training Google’s neural networks, the machines are simultaneously training us — teaching us to be more compliant, more deferential to the machines, and more conversant in machine logic… in short, remaking humanity in their own image. The future is a slouched hominid clicking on a fuzzy image of a taco shop — forever.

The brief but glorious career of Fake Warren Buffett

Novelist Steve Hely points our attention to a fake Warren Buffett account on Twitter that somehow managed to rack up more than a quarter of a million followers while dispensing such insipid pieces of advice as “read and write more” and “you are not your job.” In a series of ridiculous tweets that captivated the entire internet, Fake Buffett guides us through the vicissitudes of life, offering his thoughts on “what’s cool” (saying thank you and holding doors open are cool), and serving up specially tailored “advice for the all the young people” [sic]. The account was suspended for being fake after just a few days of tweeting, but not before garnering approving retweets and likes from some of the biggest personalities in the media and entertainment world.

Many of these people apparently thought the advice was coming from the real Buffett, but putting aside the issue of their gullibility, it’s rather amazing how huge of a market there is for platitudes that would look lame even on a motivational poster. Fake Buffett may have been short-lived, but his legacy will endure as a window into the tragic mental landscape of the modern American.

UFO invasion?

Government shenanigans, or a prelude to first contact?

A fleet of unidentified flying objects has been spotted over China.

Three orbs of light moving in an eerie linear motion were first captured above the municipality of Chongqing in south-western China, but the UFOs have also been sighted in the country’s northwest and even as far as in the eastern city of Shanghai and Fujian province.

Local residents and social media users have been commenting in their thousands while trying to work out the origin of the lights, which some believed to be LED bulbs on a kite or sky lanterns.

[…]

Given the widespread nature of the sightings, members of the public have surmised that it is a nationwide event.

And because the Chinese government has so far been mute about the UFOs, netizens have not ruled out the possibility of it being an alien invasion.

Free money

Man is given $1.3 million in free money, and it ends badly:

A debt-ridden student blew $1.3 million on sports cars, speedboats, strippers and cocaine after a bank error gave him an unlimited overdraft.

Wannabe playboy Luke Moore lived the high life for two years before he was caught by cops and jailed on fraud charges.

The Australian treated himself to luxury holidays, an Aston Martin, a Maserati and a boat while living the ultimate bachelor lifestyle.

But he was slapped with a four-year jail term last year after the banking glitch came to light.

Moore, 29, went free last week after winning an appeal of his conviction on the grounds that his actions were not deceptive.

I’ll say. What could be the basis for charging him with fraud? He took what was given to him.

Interesting that this went undetected for two years. That’s what happens when everything is automated and the element of human judgement is removed. Would your local banker allow you to withdraw a million bucks over two years because of a “glitch”?

He is now broke and living with his mother in Goulburn, New South Wales, ironically while studying to become a criminal lawyer.

But he told the Daily Telegraph he did not miss his multimillionaire lifestyle “besides the cocaine, the strippers and fast cars.”

This is the type of thing that makes me think that a universal basic income (UBI), instead of bringing about a great flourishing of the human spirit, would actually lead to the swift collapse of society.