Chicago in one sentence?

Paul Graham on the subtle messages that great cities send:

Great cities attract ambitious people. You can sense it when you walk around one. In a hundred subtle ways, the city sends you a message: you could do more; you should try harder.

The surprising thing is how different these messages can be. New York tells you, above all: you should make more money. There are other messages too, of course. You should be hipper. You should be better looking. But the clearest message is that you should be richer.

What I like about Boston (or rather Cambridge) is that the message there is: you should be smarter. You really should get around to reading all those books you’ve been meaning to.

When you ask what message a city sends, you sometimes get surprising answers. As much as they respect brains in Silicon Valley, the message the Valley sends is: you should be more powerful. […]

The big thing in LA seems to be fame. […]

In DC the message seems to be that the most important thing is who you know. You want to be an insider.

As a resident of Chicago, this naturally made me wonder what message the Windy City sends to people. A couple of excellent candidates are proposed on the Y Combinator message board:

Chicago: You went to the wrong fraternity

And:

Chicago: There’s nothing wrong with second place.

But seriously, folks. Chicago is a great global city, it’s just hard to sum it up in one sentence because it’s such a mixed bag of industries. Chicago is said to have the most diversified economy in the US; its “industry mix most closely matches the nation’s, with no single industry employing more than 14% of the workforce,” according to World Business Chicago. Top industries in Chicago range from finance and insurance, to food processing and manufacturing, to publishing and biotech. The city is also a major logistics and transportation hub, as well as a cultural and academic powerhouse.

Chicago has a protean quality that makes it somewhat hard to pin down. There may be no tidy way to summarize the city’s “message.” Part of the issue is that Chicago is a regional magnet for talent, but not a national one. People don’t flock to Chicago from across the country. (That has a lot to do with the weather, among other things.) Thus, while Chicago is a great city, it may not be a true hub of ambition in the way Graham is talking about.

This comment gets the last word:

As a cartoonist covering life in the Chicago area for the past 20 or so years, here is what Chicago says; “You really need to be successful here, but if not, someone just might help you.”

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