Hundreds of millions of bullet train trips expected during Chinese New Year

China high-speed rail update:

China already has the globe’s longest bullet-train network, but it’s plowing 3.5 trillion yuan ($556 billion) into expanding its railway system by 18 percent over the next two years, to 150,000 kilometers, or more than 93,000 miles.

Ponder this as the US considers a budget plan that includes $200 billion in federal spending on infrastructure over 10 years. (State and local government and private firms are expected to step in, bringing the total to $1.5 trillion.)

Almost 400 million people — that’s more than the U.S. population — will travel by train over the Lunar New Year, also known as Spring Festival. China’s factories and offices shut down for the week-long holiday, which unleashes the largest migration of humans on the planet. Many of the country’s 1.4 billion citizens return to their hometowns for family gatherings, or, increasingly, are taking the chance to be tourists both at home and abroad.

While the advent of cut-price flights has dimmed the appeal of rail travel in other parts of the world, in China it’s on the rise. Last Spring Festival saw a record 10.96 million trips on one day, and for the first time more people took bullet trains than conventional ones, according to official data.

From state media:

About 390 million trips will be made by train, China Railway said in a news release sent to the Global Times.

China Railway said 57.5 percent of rail travelers will take high-speed trains, up 4.8 percent from previous year.

I’ve been caught up in the Spring Festival travel rush on more than one occasion. It’s not pleasant.

If you can’t get your hands on a high-speed train ticket (starting at $42 for the 409-mile journey between Chengdu and Xi’an), may I suggest some alternative methods of travel?

By car:

China Spring Festival travelOn foot:

China Spring Festival travelBy ferry:

China Spring Festival travelIn uniform:

China Spring Festival travelI wrote about my bullet train ride from Guangzhou to Beijing in 2013 here. In that post, I noted:

Infrastructure in China tends to be unsettlingly vast, so I had a familiar feeling when walking around Guangzhou South Station. Designed by a London architecture firm, the mammoth structure sprawls over some 5.2 million sq ft, with multiple floors for arrivals, departures, and metro lines. A beautiful 1,142-ft-long skylight soars over the departures concourse. The enormous size of the station seemed to be justified by the crowds, which even on a Monday afternoon were substantial. During Chinese New Year the place is probably packed, and usage will surely increase over time as the region continues to boom.

At the time, it wasn’t necessarily clear that there was enough demand to justify this vast high-speed rail buildup. I think that question has been settled in the affirmative by now.

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