Infrastructure: the thread

I have a bridge in Oklahoma to sell you

Investor and “extreme salesman” Adam Townsend has a few thoughts on US infrastructure spending. Behold, a Twitter thread that I think is worth preserving for posterity:

Adam Townsend
@adamscrabble
1. This is going to be a fun thread, it’s gonna be about finance and U.S. infrastructure. If that’s your groove, you’re going to swing. Lets begin… Historically, infrastructure financing has been done through public authority issuance of bonds….,

2. …the interest on which is tax-exempt to the recipient. There are three problems
Lower quality revenue stream projects need an equity component or a guarantee by a creditworthy public authority or municipality. These are becoming scarcer…

3. Construction costs tend to be higher when projects are built by the government rather than the private sector. These higher construction costs offset the benefit of lower interest rates, especially in today’s low rate environment when spreads between taxable…

4. and tax-free bonds are so small
Not all projects may meet the complex eligibility rules. Public bonds need to be issued in relatively large amounts so that there is a reasonable aftermarket. The money must also be spent on the project within a certain amount of time…

5. relative to the date the bonds are issued. These restrictions limit the extent to which the drawdown of the funds can be matched to the construction schedule. In today’s especially low short-term rate environment this means the project will have to pay a negative interest rate

6. arbitrage on money it actually doesn’t need yet or get a short term construction loan and run the risk that interest rates will rise between the date that the loan is taken down and the date of the long term refinancing.

7. now.. lets talk about NEW FUNDING MECHANISMS! were talking about…Pension funds, insurers and other institutions with long-term liabilities. The long-term nature of infrastructure programs means these investments are structurally well matched to the revenue flows…

8. from the debt that finances their construction, operation and maintenance.
Recently… the Japan Government Pension Investment Fund has been in cabinet-level talks. The GPIF will purchase debt issued by American corporations to finance infrastructure projects.

9. Up to 5% of the roughly $1.14 trillion in assets controlled by the megafund can go toward overseas infrastructure projects,,, [Related: “The US and Japan have emerged as new investment destinations, making up 11% and 3%, respectively, of the total global infrastructure assets, GPIF said,” but so far this total is only a few billion dollars]
I had this discussion at cabinet level with Trumps people… lets talk about it…

10. The Trump infrastructure tax financing plan
A major private sector, revenue neutral option to help finance a significant share of the nation’s infrastructure needs. For infrastructure construction to be financeable privately, it needs a revenue stream from which to pay…

11, …operating costs, the interest and principal on the debt,and the dividends on the equity.
The difficulty with forecasting that revenue stream arises from trying to determine what the pricing, utilization rates, and operating costs will be over the decades.

12. Therefore,an equity cushion to absorb such risk is required by lenders. The size of the required equity cushion will vary with the riskiness of the project. Assuming an average leverage will be about five times equity.

13. ok, now ure bored, so its gonna get crazy fun now, cool?
Some numbers,,,
Every $200 billion in additional infrastructure expenditures creates $88billion more in wages for average Americans and increases real GDP growth by more than a percentage point.

14, Each GDP point creates 1.2 million additional jobs.
I’m gonna blow ure mind now, buckle up!

The US has infrastructure needs of about $3.6 trillion through 2020, including…

15. $1.7 trillion for roads, bridges and transit alone
Traffic delays cost the U.S. economy more than $50 billion annually
iPhones are smarter than many of our air traffic control systems

As a reward for being such a great guest, here’s a pic of me and my cat

btw, Peter Navarro who was the tzar pushing the Infrastructure plan, was moved over to Trade tzar – where he is truly
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A mot of people have asked about what Obama did with the 787 billion that was allocated for infrastructure. So, I am going to explain reality, sit back and read on. Lets begin anew…

118,000 bridges have been recorded as hazardous. This is about 30% of the American bridges yet account for only 6% of the United States population: Oklahoma, Missouri, Kansas, Nebraska and South Dakota. Iowa alone has 25,000 bridges and only 3 million citizens.

These bridges do not have an industrial use. Of our 600,000 bridges most are trafficked only by livestock and people on a scenic walk. They have nothing to do with interstate commerce, GDP growth or national public infrastructure.

There are also 19,000 structurally deficient bridges in another 35 states, these states have a combined population of 175 million and more than 600 citizens per bridge.

80% of bridges in need of serious repair are in California. They have improperly used earmarked monies for general fund expenditures. Money was allocated, it was spent elsewhere by the state (wink and nudge to the State public employee pension system. More cat pix. /End

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