Interstellar

Voyoager 2 satellite interstellar

The second man-made object in history has now broken free of the sun’s influence and embarked on the long, cold journey into interstellar space:

After launching in 1977, NASA’s trailblazing spacecraft Voyager 2 has finally escaped the heliosphere, the Sun’s protective bubble of charged particles. It follows in the path of its sibling, Voyager 1, which crossed into interstellar space in 2012.

The Sun’s solar wind makes up the heliosphere, which surrounds all the planets in our solar system. The boundary where the hot solar winds of the heliosphere end and give way to the cold interstellar medium is known as the heliopause, and it’s also the border of interstellar space. On November 5, 2018, instruments aboard NASA’s Voyager 2 spacecraft sent back data indicating the craft had crossed the heliopause. The craft is now traveling and collecting data in interstellar space more than 11 billion miles (17 billion kilometers) from Earth.

Safe travels!

Speaking of space, this caught my eye:

In a study published March 9 in The Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, astronomers announced the discovery that all disk galaxies rotate about once every billion years, no matter their size or mass.

“It’s not Swiss watch precision,” said Gerhardt Meurer, an astronomer from the International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research (ICRAR), in a press release. “But regardless of whether a galaxy is very big or very small, if you could sit on the extreme edge of its disk as it spins, it would take you about a billion years to go all the way round.”

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