Jurisdiction creep

I don’t see how this can be viewed as anything other than insane overreach of US power:

How far past the water’s edge do America’s laws apply? Can the US become a focal point from crimes allegedly committed in places like Indonesia, Africa, and Europe? Those questions are not hypothetical. Rather, they are being asked in courtrooms across the US, from New Haven, Connecticut, to Brooklyn, New York, to Salt Lake City, Utah, and up to Congress and the Supreme Court.

In New Haven, the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA) trial of Lawrence Hoskins, a British national, enters its second week for actions alleged to have been committed in Indonesia. Already, an appellate court has pared back the charges being leveled at Hoskins on the grounds of governmental overreach. As the US Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit saw things, the FCPA applied to non-resident foreigners only in those instances where the government could demonstrate that the individual acted as an agent of a “domestic concern” or while actually in the US.

The crazy example of Huawei CFO Meng Wanzhou also fits in here. The US government is seeking the extradition of a non-resident foreigner whose alleged crimes were apparently not even committed in the US. Will anyone take US complaints seriously when China begins detaining Americans on spurious grounds?

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