Running the numbers

Professor Balding does the math on US/China tariffs and finds that there may be somewhat less to the “trade war” than meets the eye:

Playing with some numbers here. YTD US exports to China are down 19% and imports from China are down 12%. To the horror of sky is falling people, these are borderline irrelevant numbers set against the US and global economies. Let’s have some perspective. For instance, 1/n

If US exports to China rose by an unprecedented amount of 19% rather than falling 19%, this would raise US GDP 0.1%. Just for illustration, imports and exports rising by those amounts rather than falling are equal to only 0.4% of US GDP. As a percentage of world GDP this 2/n

Amounts to 0.1% of world GDP. Put another way. This might be having a small impact on US and Chinese economies, it is irrelevant to the global economy. To put this number in perspective for China. If Chinese exports rose by 12% instead of falling by that amount you the US, 3/n

The Chinese economy would have grown by $63 billion. This would have added 0.45% to their economy. However this is a tiny number compared they reliance on credit. By comparison, China has added more $3 trillion in new credit since this time last year. In other words, 4/n

The marginal difference in trade is equal to 2% of rapidly expanding credit flows. Whatever your thoughts on the state of affairs a wee bit of reality is needed when blaming all nature of phenomenon on the not a trade war trade war. Done.

Meanwhile, in Thailand:

Thai officials glimpse a silver lining in the U.S.-China trade war as companies such as Sony Corp. move production to Southeast Asia’s second-largest economy.

At least 10 firms are in the process of relocating some production to Thailand from China, according to the National Economic & Social Development Council. More than a dozen others could potentially choose Thailand, it said in a statement.

“We may not see the impact on the economy now, but in the second half of 2019, it could become a positive factor for growth,” the agency’s Deputy Secretary-General Wichayayuth Boonchit said Monday.

Manufacturers are trying to escape US tariffs on imports from China.

The 10 firms moving some manufacturing to Thailand include Sony, Sharp Corp., Harley-Davidson Inc. and Delta Electronics Inc. Most have finalized locations near Bangkok or in the so-called Eastern Economic Corridor development zone, according to the economic and social development agency.

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