People don’t like fuel tax hikes

At this point, I think that’s a safe conclusion to draw from events in France and, now, Zimbabwe:

Violent protests erupted in Zimbabwe’s two largest cities after the government announced a massive fuel hike.

Police fired tear gas in order to contain the protests in the capital Harare and Bulawayo Monday, while protesters threw rocks, burned tires and blocked streets.

There were media reports of riot police using live ammunition to disperse the crowds.

At least 13 people were injured by gunfire, the Zimbabwe Association of Doctors for Human Rights said.

The clashes came on the first day of a three-day strike called by unions in response to an intensifying economic crisis.

On Saturday, President Emmerson Mnangagwa announced a 150 percent rise in fuel prices.

More Zimbabwe news (from last November):

Zimbabwe’s President Emmerson Mnangagwa on Friday laid the foundation stone for huge new parliament to be built with Chinese funds outside the capital Harare.

The imposing circular complex will be built over 32 months by the Shanghai Construction group at Mount Hampden, 18 kilometres (11 miles) north-west of Harare, the Zimbabwe Broadcasting Corporation reported.

Officials say the current colonial-era parliamentary building in the city centre is too small to accommodate lawmakers.

Mnangagwa said at the ceremony that China had provided a “grant, not a loan, to build a new parliament”, without giving a figure.

“Other facilities like banks, hotels will be built around this place,” Mnangagwa said adding that a “modern, smart city” was planned.

Mnangagwa took over from long-time ruler Robert Mugabe who was ousted by the military in November 2017.

He has vowed to revive Zimbabwe’s economy that has been in ruins for nearly two decades.

China has funded and provided loans for many infrastructure projects across Africa in recent years, ranging from roads and power plants to sports stadiums and government institutions.

Critics say China’s increasing sway over the continent undermines democracy and sovereignty.

China’s global development empire

China development AidData

China’s global development footprint, mapped according to commitment size (Source: AidData)

The College of William & Mary has put together a handy map of China’s global Marshall Plan:

This online web map by AidData, a research lab at William & Mary in the United States, pinpoints the location of thousands of Chinese-funded development projects across the globe using data from AidData’s Geocoded Global Chinese Official Finance Dataset released September 11, 2018.

With more than 3,485 Chinese Government-financed projects in 138 countries and territories, this dataset is the most comprehensive source of public information ever assembled on the locations and attributes of Chinese development projects worldwide.

Those 3,485 projects implemented between 2000-2014 are worth a total of $273.6 billion in official financing. By way of comparison, the actual Marshall Plan in Europe totaled $12 billion (or $100 billion in 2016 dollars).

On a possibly related note:

In 2011, for example, delegates to the annual session of China’s parliament debated a proposal to seek employment for as many as 100 million Chinese on the African continent. One champion of this idea, Zhao Zhihai, a delegate and researcher at Zhangjiakou Academy of Agricultural Sciences at Hebei province, said: “In the current economic climate, with so many of our people unemployed, China can benefit from finding jobs for them and Africa can benefit from our expertise in developing any type of land and crop.”

–Howard French, China’s Second Continent: How a Million Migrants Are Building a New Empire in Africa