The United States of Bezos

Jeff Bezos Dr Evil

We are all Amazonians now. At this rate, Bezos might as well take over the US government:

In his best-selling book “The Four: The Hidden DNA of Amazon, Apple, Facebook and Google,” Galloway cites some arresting statistics: Far fewer U.S. households have a gun than Amazon Prime, by 30 to 64 percent. More Americans have Prime than voted in 2016 (55 percent), or earn $50,000 or more a year (55 percent), or go to church (51 percent). He calls Amazon’s ability to woo Prime subscribers at a $119 yearly cost the equivalent of “entering into a monogamous relationship” with its consumers, who as of 2016 spent, on average, $193 per month. (Non-Prime members average $138 per month.)

From 2006 to 2016 Amazon’s stock price growth surged by 1,910 percent, destroying Sears, J.C. Penney, Kmart, Best Buy, Macy’s, Nordstrom, Target and Walmart.

Perhaps most importantly: Since the Great Recession, Amazon has paid just $1.4 billion in corporate taxes compared to Walmart’s $64 billion.

Amazon is also making inroads into a wide array of sectors and institutions that have nothing to do with retail, let alone selling books:

Bezos has even greater ambitions. His acquisition of Whole Foods, which plunged competitor Kroger’s stock from $31 to $22 per share, is but one step in dominating what and how we eat. Amazon is spending $5 billion on original programming this year and is on pace to outspend Netflix by 2022.

Think about that, Galloway says: A retailer in Seattle as content king. And after announcing a vague health care initiative back in January, stock prices for major health care insurers plummeted — such is Amazon’s power that the mere hint of market entry damages long-standing competitors.

That’s not all. Bezos’ company Blue Origin, with a mission statement that goes not just to colonizing the planet but outer space — “Earth, in all its beauty, is just our starting place” — plans to launch the first private manned spaceflight by next year. Bezos also says he’s going to establish free preschools in low-income areas based on the Montessori method.

Outer space aside: Amazon wants to feed, treat, entertain, educate and medicate America — and that’s just what it’s told us. Nothing Orwellian here, right?

And while Amazon is raising its minimum wage to $15 an hour, the mega-corporation is also striving mightily to replace its human workforce with robots. Perhaps not coincidentally, Bezos has expressed support for the idea of a universal basic income. It’s not hard to envision a future in which a fully automated Bezos empire services all the needs of a jobless, perpetually entertained population — with Alexa replacing the school system, Amazon Hospitals treating the sick, and Amazon Prime Drones equipped with Hellfire missiles providing security. Brave New World is real, and His Fordship sits in Seattle, a bald guy with a creepy laugh.

Why so serious?

UAE smile door

(Photo by M. Sajjad)

The United Arab Emirates wants you turn that frown upside down — or else:

A quirky new initiative launched in Ajman will see officials ensure that customers are happy about their services – literally. After a transaction at the Public Transport Corporation, while exiting, clients would need to smile to activate the sensor to slide the doors open.

If a customer does not smile, indicating their dissatisfaction, executives at the centre would assist him/her to resolve the issue.

According to Omar Mohammed Lootah, chief operating officer, operations, at the corporation, the initiative will help increase customer satisfaction.

“The smile breaks the office monotony and brings life to the organisation,” he said.

One wonders when the Public Transport Corporation will introduce mandatory orgy-porgies.

No travel for you

North by Northwest smoking on trainIn the latest evolution of China’s social credit system, people who have committed offenses like smoking on trains or defaulting on fines will now be effectively banned from traveling:

China said it will begin applying its so-called social credit system to flights and trains and stop people who have committed misdeeds from taking such transport for up to a year.

People who would be put on the restricted lists included those found to have committed acts like spreading false information about terrorism and causing trouble on flights, as well as those who used expired tickets or smoked on trains, according to two statements issued on the National Development and Reform Commission’s website on Friday. […]

However, there are signs that the use of social credit scoring on domestic transport could have started years ago. In early 2017, the country’s Supreme People’s Court said during a press conference that 6.15 million Chinese citizens had been banned from taking flights for social misdeeds.

That’s an extraordinary number of people. A case could be made that people who, for example, open the emergency exit of a moving plane should be put on some kind of no-fly list, but only a small fraction of 6.15 million citizens can possibly be guilty of those types of offenses.