Term limits

Impressive shilling here:

What’s more, America’s belief in the redemptive value of term limits merits further examination. In some political jurisdictions, it has helped bring in new blood; but, in others, it has replaced seasoned leaders with fresh nonsensical amateurs, to the detriment of good governance.

Indeed, in the 20th century, most assessments of presidential performance would place Franklin D. Roosevelt, our 32nd president, at the top of the list. He was elected not just to three terms but four. In 1951, the 22nd amendment to the US Constitution was ratified, which seemed like a good idea at the time; and perhaps even more so now. But there were moments in-between when America had its doubts about the constitutional dogmatism of having to force someone out of office who was doing the job well.

The problem with citing America’s “doubts” about the wisdom of term limits to defend another country’s scrapping of term limits under completely different circumstances is that it’s risibly stupid. With the notable exception of FDR, the consensus in the US has always been that a president should not hold office for more than two terms. What this signifies is not a “belief in the redemptive value of term limits,” which is just a dumb strawman, but a profound unwillingness to be ruled by another monarch.

Formal term limits weren’t needed for most of American history because the informal convention of a two-term limit, established by Washington, prevented nearly all presidents from even seeking a third term until FDR. After FDR was elected for an unprecedented four terms, Congress adopted the 22nd Amendment creating a formal two-term limit in 1951.

The key point here is that Americans decided it was time to slap some term limits on their leaders, and then did so. The 22nd Amendment was enshrined in the Constitution through a lawful, public and consensual process, which required ratification by three-quarters of the states of the Union. And public opinion is strongly against repealing it.

Compare this process to the shady, unilateral power-grab that is the topic of Tom Plate’s article, and laugh.

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