The Internet of Incredibly Scary Things

If you are thinking about getting one of those wifi-enabled home security cameras, you might want to think again. At the very least, if you do get one, please create a password for it that you have not used elsewhere.

Otherwise, your fancy “Internet of Things” device might get hijacked by a hacker and start barking nuclear missile warnings at you or talking to your children in a deep, scary voice – which are actual things that happened to families in California. The hackers might also mess with your thermostat while they’re at it.

I take a dim view of the “Internet of Things.” It seems like a total scam to me. I do not see how our lives are materially improved by connecting our devices to the Internet, especially when you factor in the time-wasting complexities of managing these devices and the opportunities for hacking and massive privacy violations that they create.

If you have to get one of these cheap security camera systems that require a stable internet connection to function, for Pete’s sake choose a unique login password:

Nest’s parent company, Google, said in a statement that Nest’s system was not breached. Google said the recent incidents stem from customers “using compromised passwords … exposed through breaches on other websites.”

I recommend using the open-source password manager KeePass – you can download it here. It will store all your passwords in a file that is controlled by a single master password. KeePass will even generate unique random passwords for you every time you create a new entry. Whenever you need to log in to an online account, just copy and paste the password from KeePass.

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